Christians Do the Darndest Things!

darndestMy wife and I are shopping this weekend and we see this:

Someone had plastered the alcohol case and displays with these pamphlets, apparently to save folk from their alcoholic sins.  And I mean plastered–they were stuck on cases, inside cases, and taped to all of the stacked displays.

I have to ask: what exactly were they hoping to accomplish?  They ticked off the store employees (we kindly drew their attention to the problem) by taking up their time and damaging the boxes with the tape.  How can they expect to do any good with a method like this?

If someone picked up a case and found their goodie inside at home, do you think they are going to show up at church next Sunday?  Or will they chalk it up to angry Christians who don’t know how to talk to other human beings?  Do you think it will be even harder to talk to that person about Christ?  What about the store employees; how has it affected them and their beliefs about Christians?

The sad part is someone probably thinks that they “planted a seed” with their hit and run evangelism.

I pray that one day these Christians will get to experience the humbling joy of being used by God in someone’s life.

I pray that our culture will not see a God that is distant and removed, but a God that loves them and wants to know them.

What do you think?

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6 Responses

  1. I guess if one person, just one mind you actually opened it up and read it and they were searching for answers and they got saved. I don’t have a problem with people going outside of the box to try to evangelize the world. People that believe in calvanism thinking that the people will just miraculously come to them or happen to fall upon a website church, those people are sadly mistaken. The bible says that we are to GO not wait and see if they come to me. If a couple of boxes of beer get trashed in the mean time, oh well. It seems that only someone that is not apposed to beer and the affects that it brings or the homes that it destroys could or would be apposed to this sort of thing. I could say a lot more but I think part of my point was made. Have a great day and to whoever put those tracts to salvation, a way to eternal life instead of condemned life, keep up the good work. All it takes is one.

  2. While I would be against damaging the packaging, tracts can often be placed into the holes in the packaging. The gospel is the power of God unto salvation (Romans 1:16). If these tracts contain the gospel, God can use them to save someone. I’m very surprised that you would begrudge someone the opportunity to hear or read the gospel.

    If you really felt strongly that the tracts weren’t placed wisely, maybe you should have helped your Christian brother with his placement, rather than just ratting him out. I’m sure the employees would have also appreciated this route.

    Thanks,
    Bill

  3. I’ll be honest (but gentle), I just don’t agree with a couple things in the comments. I just don’t see it as appropriate to hide tracts in any way in or on product in a store (or anywhere, but I’ll get to that). I think it is disrespectful. I also don’t buy the “if it reaches one person” or “God’s word doesn’t return in vain” argument. I don’t think that excuses foolishness or laziness. In my opinion, lots of Christians have used that argument to justify poor evangelism.
    This really is spurred from a specific place with me. I’m not a fan of tracts used this way. I know there are lots of arguments for or against, but this is the deal for me: statistically the huge majority of people come to know Christ through a friend–not a pamphlet. And once again I don’t buy the “just one” argument. The damage that can be done by many people who find it insulting and borderline evangelical littering far outweighs the possibility of one person coming to Christ.
    It’s like this: You could argue, “If I threw a thousand seeds out my car window, some plants might grow. If just one or two grows, some people will have food and be blessed.” But wouldn’t it make more sense in invest time in a field, take care of it, prepare it, and strategically plant the seeds? Doesn’t that result in a harvest a million times larger? And even worse, imagine if some of your plants grew in someones yard. You didn’t ask their permission and they will likely find it an annoyance. But imagine if you befriend them and share your harvest with them; won’t they be thankful and more willing to receive it?
    Thank you so much for your comments and reading, really. I do really enjoy the discussion, and no I don’t have all the answers. I hope you stick around in the future.

  4. Hey Dan, thanks for reading. I pointed out a couple other things in replay, but really quickly:

    I’m not suggesting that we wait for people to show up. I actually think getting involved in peoples lives personally involves much more “go-ing” than dropping off tracts.
    I just don’t understand how damaging property and not respecting other people show’s God’s love in a good light.

  5. Thoughtpuddle,

    If I had to summarize your position it would be that the gospel isn’t really adequate for salvation. It needs something else added to it, like our kindness and good deeds, in order to really get someone saved.

    Granted there is no discussion of printed literature in the Bible (since it didn’t exist), but there is plenty of evidence of the gospel being adequate for people to be saved. Peter open-air preached (Acts 2), and 3000 were saved. Paul open air preached many times in the book of Acts.

    You should do whatever you think God is leading you to do in your evangelism. I think the only time we should criticize someone for how they’re evangelizing is if they’re just doing something sinful, or not speaking truthfully. God began a good work in the people who left those tracts, and He’ll carry it through to completion without our criticism.

    Thanks,
    Bill

  6. Bill,

    You’ve got some interesting points. I really want to expand on this conversation in some future posts. Until then, thanks for reading!

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